Events highlight MPH’s strengths  

Professor_Rob_Moddie

A strong turnout at two information events demonstrated the escalating interest in the Master of Public Health (MPH) offered by Melbourne School of Population and Global Health at the University of Melbourne.Held in late 2012, the events outlined the vocationally rich options available to prospective students and graduates of the internationally recognised degree.
On Wednesday 3 October 2012 at the MPH career night, about 50 current MPH students found out how and where to find jobs, and heard from experts with international, public and private sector backgrounds. The six specialist presenters included Duane Attree, Director, PricewaterhouseCoopers Advisory, and Colin Oliver, Director of the Melbourne office of Lee Hecht Harrison.
Feedback was overwhelmingly positive, with students particular valuing the opportunity to network with presenters and other postgrad students.
At the School’s graduate information night on Tuesday 9 October 2012, about 40 prospective students discovered why the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health’s MPH is the best in Australia.
Professor Rob Moodie, the School’s Professor of Public Health, was one of the presenters. He later described the MPH as “the ticket to significant job opportunities in public health”. “Our MPH is highly globally focused,” he said. “This is in terms of where our students come from and where they go to after completing our MPH. “Our students originate from more than 40 countries – we have the highest number of AusAID scholarship MPH students in the country – and many of our MPH graduates take up public health positions around the globe.”This diverse mix of professional and personal backgrounds among students made the MPH a highly enriching experience as students learned from their peers as well as their course lecturers, he said.
The School recently held several focus groups with the MPH Students Club to ensure the MPH continued to meet students’ vocational needs. Professor Moodie said the feedback was very positive. “The MPH students appreciate the care and effort that lecturers put into the courses and the fact that they can choose from a number of different streams,” he said. “They also enjoy having a large, flexible choice of electives, in addition to their core subjects. “And they like coming to the best-ranked university in Australia.”
Yogesh Jha, a radiological technologist from Nepal, a recipient of an AusAID Australian Development Scholarship, is a current MPH student. His choice of where to study was influenced by the University’s international standing. “However, the most important thing was the flexibility in tailoring the course to a candidate’s area of interest,” he said.  “I think the Master of Public Health will transform me into a more skilled public health professional,” he said. “When I finish my MPH, I would definitely love to work with global health organisations in my own country or other countries.”
The School draws on the global expertise of the Nossal Institute for Global Health, which includes inspiring opportunities such as the three-week placement at the world-renowned Comprehensive Rural Health Project, Jamkhed, in Maharashtra, India. The School reengineered the MPH in 20011 and improvements to the MPH include an Indigenous health specialisation, and opportunities for a professional placement unit in a wide range of settings.More information about the Master of Public Health at the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health is available here

Caption: Professor Rob Moodie